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 Post Posted: February 19th, 2017, 7:19 pm 
 

Joined: February 28th, 2013, 3:23 am
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Location: Oklahoma, United States
Speaking of noob status, BurakCanik made something go off in my head. I'm new to multi-threading, networking and AVX/2/512. I'm a noob when it comes to DirectX12, OpenGL and Vulkan. So yeah, there is still plenty of stuff for me to learn.

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 Post Posted: February 19th, 2017, 9:36 pm 
 

Joined: June 26th, 2012, 5:38 pm
Posts: 750
Location: USA
How I see it is: you are always a noob no matter how much you learn(ofc this is in the broad sense). So many programming languages ex: C, C#, C++, java, javascript, php, python, etc...). So many algorithms, paradigms, frameworks, libraries, apis to learn. The hardware underneath, the os. You can never learn it all no matter how long you keep up your learning. I feel like I haven't learned anything new for say game development in a while. But, I have learned many new algorithms, new programming languages, and some practices. I am a noob when it comes to DX, OpenGL, or any graphics api really.

My strong points are almost exactly opposite of papas. Still, I've realized there are many things I could have done better in my networking lib. The thing with game development is you will be working with many other people(unless indie), each person will generally have a specialty and do mainly that.

Learning new APIs and libraries isn't the only thing you want to be doing. Learning new languages will be a big plus if you wanna get into the field.

Chill's tutorials are what got me into programming. But what I've learned is, I enjoy programming for the most part no matter what I am programming. I would not mind doing something other than game development as a career at all. Which is why I have been broadening my horizon, by learning new languages.

On a side note: I've been craving c++ for the past (6 months?) Dang school and working getting in the way. Been taking this web dev class, and I dislike javascript and how you do things in it. Makes me miss the separation and cleanliness of c++ code. javascript is too jumbled and too loosely typed for my taste.

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 Post Posted: February 20th, 2017, 12:43 am 
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Joined: December 31st, 2011, 4:53 pm
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Location: Japan
cameron wrote:
On a side note: I've been craving c++ for the past (6 months?) Dang school and working getting in the way. Been taking this web dev class, and I dislike javascript and how you do things in it. Makes me miss the separation and cleanliness of c++ code. javascript is too jumbled and too loosely typed for my taste.


Dude, you and I are on the same wavelength here. I want to learn js for the frontend web stuff, but I just can't bring myself to do it :P Mainly for the reasons you stated above. I gotta force myself one of these days.

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 Post Posted: February 20th, 2017, 3:49 pm 
 

Joined: January 3rd, 2017, 5:12 pm
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I'm just starting to learn about all of these technical terms, API and DirectX12. I do feel extremely motivated to learn other languages too. I want to re learn XHTML or HTML because making websites was fun as hell.


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 Post Posted: March 3rd, 2017, 3:32 pm 
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Joined: February 8th, 2014, 9:16 pm
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Location: Istanbul, Turkey
I've read a nice blog post. It's about higher education in the game industry actually but the last paragraph sums up what I said previously. And I think the overall post might actually answer questions some of us may have regarding game industry career/education choices, so I'm posting the link below:

https://takinginitiative.wordpress.com/2011/10/11/a-guide-to-higher-education-for-aspiring-game-programmers/

So in a manner, what this says is a bit similar to what Chili said in another forum thread (I forgot its title...): There is no end to learning! Some people are just trying to finish programming (or math or any other kind really) books/tutorials one after another, never stopping to APPLY gained knowledge and actually solidify it. Then I realized I'm one of those people (and it shouldn't have been this long to realize it...). No matter how long you educate yourself, at some point you got to say "okay, enough with the books/tutorials, time to create something of my own". It doesn't have to be the most-efficient-and-most-photorealistic-ray-tracer-ever. But I've been "learning" for the past what, 5 years maybe ? And I don't have a project to call my own rather than these modifications of 3d graphics book demos. So what I strongly suggest is try to maintain a balance between learning and applying/experimenting/creating etc. and NOT do what I (and many novies unfortunately) do.

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 Post Posted: April 15th, 2017, 6:49 pm 
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Joined: September 14th, 2015, 10:58 pm
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I think this is a pretty important and philosophical thread so i decided to comment on this.

cameron wrote:
How I see it is: you are always a noob no matter how much you learn(ofc this is in the broad sense).

I think somewhere along the lines with cameron and MrGodin. I think there is some sort of negative
connotation to the word noob that actually conflicts with reason. I don't think it is bad to be new to something. I think it is always good to explore new stuff that one has never done before. Indeed, many people live their lives and have never seen how a computer program is made.

I also don't want to be overly optimistic and say that it is fun, inspiring or something like that. No -
if i honestly think about it - it is hard and effort-consuming. But people tend to like effort - after all - chili makes a lot of effort into making his videos - i think it is not necessarily fun - but praise of his viewers and feeling of accomplishment keeps him going.

I would not call myself master at anything. From experience i would suggest though that if you
want to be skillful at something, practice it at first not too often but regularly. With that you can
develop a kind of longing and desire to wait for the next practice to get better. And after some while
you can increase frequency of practice(in my opinion it's better than to start doing something day
and night and burning out).In almost any field that i have countered practicing basics is really important.I think it applies to programming too(so practice your ass off with loops,variables,functions,arrays and shit).
I would also suggest to be observant and seek for improvement even in simple matters. For me there is almost always been some(seemingly simple) stuff that I could have improved if i would ever thought of it(because in fact nothing is simple). Whole internet is out there where you can search
for resources and experience of others and shit. That is after all how you found this forum.

BurakCanik wrote:
I've read a nice blog post. It's about higher education


I find that post utter rubbish. I loath mandatory education including universities and their courses
and similar crap.
And speaking about career, CV's and so.In the article the guy writes that at the end ones portfolio
is important and the stuff one has really done. I have long thought about some day when i should apply for a new job with a real CV - where I would really write those things that i have mostly spent my time and effort on - like watching rubbish shared on internet, countless hours of one or other videogame etc.
I shall try it one day :lol:

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 Post Posted: April 16th, 2017, 1:57 pm 
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krautersuppe wrote:
after all - chili makes a lot of effort into making his videos - i think it is not necessarily fun - but praise of his viewers and feeling of accomplishment keeps him going.


That's partly correct ;) Of course I do really enjoy the act of teaching a concept that I'm interested in to people. There's a lot of layers to it. First, there is that feeling of introducing something you're passionate about to somebody, like introducing your friend to a movie or show you like and getting them as hooked as you are. Second, the challenge of breaking down a complex concept / skill field, analyzing it, deriving the important elements, sifting through the countess permutations of how to introduce the parts in order to optimally teach it to somebody is a challenge that I enjoy thinking about and solving.

But you are correct in that, if I were doing this but only had an audience in the tens or low hundreds, I'd have probably quit it long ago. It take quite a large amount of effort to produce these series, and enjoyment of making them alone is not enough of a payback to keep me going. It's really the appreciation of you guys, your support and the interactions that come out of this that tip the balance in favor of me continuing on in this work.

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